History

This is the old Eagleton building from the late 1800′s.

The original Eagleton Elementary School was built in 1891. It was named after William H. Eagleton. Mr. Eagleton was born in Cambridge, Ohio and came to Denver to begin his teaching career in 1880 in District 8, Arapahoe County. The following year he became superintendent of District 21. He became principal of Villa Park School in 1895. At this time Villa Park was a suburb of Denver. During Mr. Eagleton’s principalship of some forty-two years, 1895 to 1937, he did not miss a day of school. Much of his vacation time was spent in travel and study. His philosophy was exemplified by his words, “Education doesn’t stand still any more than business or the arts stand still. To keep abreast of new developments in education, one must be a constant student.”

Eagleton_Elementary_School

Exterior photograph of the Eagleton Elementary School located in Denver, Colorado. This building was replaced in 1974.

Eagleton_School_exterior

Photograph of the exterior of Eagleton Elementary School in Denver, Colorado. Date unknown.

Eagleton_School_Japan_project

Photograph of three students at Denver’s Eagleton Elementary School during a school project pertaining to Japan. One unidentified girl stands in a short kimono robe with and umbrella just outside a replica of a traditional Japanese structure. Two students sit inside the structure using chopsticks, low tables, and a tea set. On the other side of the structure is a Japanese baby doll sitting under an umbrella in an rickshaw wearing a kimono. Circa 1925.

Eagleton_School_Pueblo_Indian_Life_Culture

Photograph of three unidentified Eagleton Elementary School Students looking at a replica of a tradition Pueblo mud-brick house. Behind the students is a display of woven Pueblo artifacts. Circa 1928.

Ebert_School_teacher_with_students

Photograph of Mrs. Larson, a teacher at Eagleton Elementary School, standing behind a table of her students. She is leaning over the table with her right index finger on a student paper while with another student is facing them pointing to a place on his piece of paper. Circa 1930.